Evil gains humanity in Spielberg's 'Munich'

Publié le par David CASTEL


 
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Steven Spielberg directs Eric Bana and Geoffrey Rush in "Munich."

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Film examines terrorist groups surrounding 1972 Munich Olympics

By Nick Norman
January 12, 2006

During the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, terrorists referring to themselves as Black September burst into the athlete's dormitories and promptly took eleven Israeli hostages.

Ultimately, the hostages died along with all but three of the terrorists. The surviving members of Black September were imprisoned by German authorities, but eventually released when hijackers aboard a Lufthansa flight demanded the release of their fellow terrorists.

In response to the Munich killings, Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir authorized Operation Wrath of God. The secret plot funded teams of military assassins to eliminate the terrorist planners and survivors of the Munich massacre. Steven Spielberg's new film, "Munich," tells the story of one such Israeli task force.

Spielberg creates a unique tone by telling a tale from the point of view of the hunte so we can learn about the humanity of the trained killers. Sweat beads form on their foreheads and hands shake as they attempt to trigger bombs. It is not all professionalism for these men -- it is a battle for a culture.

But what really held my attention is constant battle to minimize collateral damage. The Israeli's zero tolerance for accidentally killing children, women and other innocents motivate much of the intense drama.

The actual action of this film is three-quarters buildup to an intense releases of gunfire, blood and smoke.

The action falls into a gripping pattern that allows for a strong pace. I was surprised at how quickly and frequently I felt the adrenaline buzz that great action can muster.

The plot wove just enough complexity to form a unique weave without overwhelming the viewer. For those concerned about the nearly three hour running time I can only assure you that it doesn't drag until the final 20 minutes. Yet be prepared to think about this film for a long time after leaving the theater. The film very clearly questions the morality of revenge and the definitions of family and home.

The battle between Arab and Jewish factions has continued for centuries. I feel that Spielberg questions the necessity of the battle over the Holy Land. He asks: why must land be the cause of war? Instead, shouldn't we fight for the opportunity to create a home anywhere we find family?

In that sense, "Munich" is a very American movie. After all, we are a nation comprised of people from other places. This country is a living example of the ability to recreate home far from the source.

In the film, an Arab terrorist said, "Home is everything." I think he meant to say, "To me, land is everything." Spielberg directs his best film since "Saving Private Ryan."

Grade: A

Contact Nick Norman at (408) 551-1918 or nicknorman@gmail.com.

Evil gains humanity in Spielberg's 'Munich'
 
story image 1  
Steven Spielberg directs Eric Bana and Geoffrey Rush in "Munich."

WWW.MEDIA.FILMFORCE.IGN.COM
 
Film examines terrorist groups surrounding 1972 Munich Olympics

By Nick Norman
January 12, 2006

During the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, terrorists referring to themselves as Black September burst into the athlete's dormitories and promptly took eleven Israeli hostages.

Ultimately, the hostages died along with all but three of the terrorists. The surviving members of Black September were imprisoned by German authorities, but eventually released when hijackers aboard a Lufthansa flight demanded the release of their fellow terrorists.

In response to the Munich killings, Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir authorized Operation Wrath of God. The secret plot funded teams of military assassins to eliminate the terrorist planners and survivors of the Munich massacre. Steven Spielberg's new film, "Munich," tells the story of one such Israeli task force.

Spielberg creates a unique tone by telling a tale from the point of view of the hunte so we can learn about the humanity of the trained killers. Sweat beads form on their foreheads and hands shake as they attempt to trigger bombs. It is not all professionalism for these men -- it is a battle for a culture.

But what really held my attention is constant battle to minimize collateral damage. The Israeli's zero tolerance for accidentally killing children, women and other innocents motivate much of the intense drama.

The actual action of this film is three-quarters buildup to an intense releases of gunfire, blood and smoke.

The action falls into a gripping pattern that allows for a strong pace. I was surprised at how quickly and frequently I felt the adrenaline buzz that great action can muster.

The plot wove just enough complexity to form a unique weave without overwhelming the viewer. For those concerned about the nearly three hour running time I can only assure you that it doesn't drag until the final 20 minutes. Yet be prepared to think about this film for a long time after leaving the theater. The film very clearly questions the morality of revenge and the definitions of family and home.

The battle between Arab and Jewish factions has continued for centuries. I feel that Spielberg questions the necessity of the battle over the Holy Land. He asks: why must land be the cause of war? Instead, shouldn't we fight for the opportunity to create a home anywhere we find family?

In that sense, "Munich" is a very American movie. After all, we are a nation comprised of people from other places. This country is a living example of the ability to recreate home far from the source.

In the film, an Arab terrorist said, "Home is everything." I think he meant to say, "To me, land is everything." Spielberg directs his best film since "Saving Private Ryan."

Grade: A

Contact Nick Norman at (408) 551-1918 or nicknorman@gmail.com

Publié dans Critiques USA

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